The Hollywood Walk of Fame is a popular attraction and tribute to Hollywood’s greatest entertainers, the Walk of Fame along both sides of Hollywood Boulevard from La Brea to Gower and both sides of Vine Street from Sunset to Yucca includes over 2300 terrazzo and brass stars embedded in the sidewalk.

Dedication ceremonies are open to the public. A listing of existing stars with their locations, upcoming ceremonies and other information about the Hollywood Walk of Fame are available from the Hollywood Chamber of Commerce website.

The success of the Hollywood and Highland Center has recently made that section of the Walk of Fame sidewalk the most popular location for placement of new stars—there’s now a double row of stars along this section of the Walk of Fame. You will almost always find several star impersonators here, and in front of Grauman’s Chinese Theatre next door, encouraging tourists to pose with them. This also the most popular section on the Walk of Fame to see street performers working for tips.

As originally designed by California artist Oliver Weismuller the Walk of Fame ended at Sycamore Street but it was later extended to La Brea and the Silver Four Ladies of Hollywood Statue—a 30-foot-tall gazebo supported by four figures representing actresses Dorothy Dandridge, Dolores del Rio, Mae West and Anna May Wong. The Silver Four Ladies of Hollywood Gazebo is topped with a four sided spire with the word Hollywood on each side and a very small statue of Marilyn Monroe in the famous pose with her dress billowing from the 1955 move The Seven Year Itch.

Joanne Woodward’s star was the first to be placed on the Hollywood Walk of Fame—on February 9, 1960—and an average of 20 stars are now added each year. Stars are awarded in five categories—radio, television, motion pictures, recording and live performance. Many entertainers have stars on the Walk of Fame in more than one category. Gene Autry is the only individual with a star in all 5 categories.Bob Hope, Mickey Rooney and Tony Martin each have 4 stars on the Walk of Fame. Bing Crosby, Dinah Shore and Frank Sinatra are three stars with 3 stars each. Others with 3 stars are Bud Abbot, Lou Costello, Nelson Eddy, Tennessee Ernie Ford, Jane Froman, Spike Jones, Conrad Nagel, Dick Powell, Basil Rathbone, Roy Rogers, Charles Ruggles, Gale Storm, Fred Waring, Marie Wilson and Robert Young. Many more entertainers have 2 stars each and others have only 1 star.

Disney was the first corporate recipient after companies became eligible for a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in 2005. There are also stars for fictional characters such as Bugs Bunny, Donald Duck and Kermit the Frog and a star for at least one animal—Lassie.

A Walk of Fame Committee with members representing each of the five categories meets once a year in June to consider an average of 200 nominations. Individuals or groups nominated must have five or more years in the entertainment field and agree to attend the dedication ceremony.

A fee of $15,000—to pay for the star itself, the dedication ceremony and maintenance of the Walk of Fame—is required upon selection by the committee. Many stars are sponsored by movie studios or record companies in conjunction with the release of a new movie or recording.

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